Chinese / Cooking / Duck

Steamed Preserved Duck and Taro with Miso and Garlic


Preserved Duck and Taro with Miso and GarlicIt’s always such a blessing when I get some of Grandma’s home cooking, especially this Steamed Preserved Duck and Taro with Miso and Garlic.  The ingredients don’t have to be fancy.  The cooking doesn’t have to be complicated.  And the atmosphere doesn’t have to be posh.  But Grandma’s food always have the ability to tug at those heartstrings.

This recipe is from my Grandma, who paired preserved duck and taro to make this a distinct Cantonese dish.  A favorite winter food in Hong Kong, preserved duck meat is cured in salt which helps it to retain the meat’s pink color even when cooked.  Highlighting the duck’s savoriness with a sweet, rich miso and garlic adds a great new depth of flavor to this traditional comfort food.

Total Time: 45 minutes

Ingredients: 
2 lb. large taro
1 preserved duck leg (approx. 8 oz)
1.5 tbsp.miso paste
1 tbsp. garlic, minced
oil


Instructions:
1) Prepare a pot with boiling water and place a steaming rack inside.  Steam preserved duck leg whole for 15 minutes to render the fat.   Remove from heat and cut into pieces with kitchen shears.
2) Remove skin from taro and cut taro into .5″ thick slices.
3) Cover bottom of a pan generously with oil over high heat.  Reduce flame to medium heat. Place taro slices and pan fry until golden brown.  Remove from heat.
4) Mix the miso paste with the garlic.  Spread the paste evenly over the taro slices.  Set aside.
5) Prepare a steam-safe glass pan for steaming.  Place the duck skin side down into the pan and layer taro over it.  Steam over high heat for 15-20 minutes.  Remove from heat.
6) Place the serving plate upside down, on top of the glass pan.  With kitchen mittens, hold both the plate and glass pan firmly and flip both upside down.  Serve immediately.

Preserved Duck and Taro with Miso and Garlic

Tips:
Steaming the preserved duck first helps to render the excess duck fat and make the duck easier cut into pieces.

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